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Early Admissions Trends: Class of 2024

With Class of 2024 results now coming in on the early admissions round at top colleges and universities around the country, here is our expert assessment on what we’ve learned thus far. We’ll continue to update our information as more schools release their information.

UPS AND DOWNS

Unlike past years that saw big gains in everyone’s early numbers, this year was more of a mixed bag. Brown saw its number of early decision applicants grow by 8 percent, on top of a 21 percent increase in ED last year. Cornell, too, saw its pool grow by 7.4 percent and a news release from the university reminds us that the number of early decision applicants has grown 90 percent over the last decade.

Harvard saw its pool decrease by nearly 8 percent over last year to 6,958 early applicants. The last time Harvard saw its early pool decrease was in the fall of 2013 for applicants to the Class of 2018. Duke’s early decision pool decreased by 552 students (11.4 percent) over last year. Dartmouth’s early decision pool decreased by 16 percentage points over last year to 2,069. Likewise, Penn saw its early decision applicant pool drop by 9 percent from the record level reached last fall.

Natural disasters, school shootings, global economic uncertainty, teacher strikes, and demographic trends are cited by admissions deans as possible explanations for declining early pools. It could also be that savvy students are being more strategic in how they use their early option, aiming for a surer bet rather than going for the long-shot. We’ll continue to monitor these trends and share our perspective as more data are released in the coming months.

WHAT WE KNOW SO FAR

  • Diversity of background continues to be a key priority in the selection process. Schools are working actively to build more diversity into their applicant pools through targeted outreach and partnerships with organizations like Questbridge.
  • Several schools made particular mention of greater numbers of low income and first-generation college students among the group offered admission. These hooks are clear institutional priorities increasingly supported through the admissions process.
  • Both Cornell and Penn are schools that went big for legacy admits, with 22 percent and 24 percent of the ED admits, respectively, being the children of alumni.
  • Many schools with binding early decision programs will admit 45-50+ percent of their incoming class through the early process. Doing so ensures that they can lock in a solid foundation for their incoming class and reduce yield volatility.

TOUGHEST SCHOOL TO GET INTO THIS EARLY ROUND?

Based on publicly reported data, the toughest early admission pool this year belonged to MIT. This year, 9,291 students applied for early admission to MIT, and 687 (7%) were offered admission.

Class of 2024 Early Program Admit Rates

Remember for the vast majority of top schools (MIT being the exception), the rate of admission in the early round will be significantly higher than the rate of admission for regular applicants. Duke, for instance, admitted 20% of its early applicants; last year it admitted only 5.7% of its regular decision applicants.

SELECTED EARLY ROUND APPLICANT POOL STATS

Class of 2024 Early Admissions Selected Results
Early Admissions Results_Georgetown

Brown admitted 800 students this December, corresponding to roughly 45 percent of its incoming class. The admitted group represents just 17.5 percent of its 4,562 early decision applicants, making this the most competitive early decision process they’ve ever experienced. The 4,562 students represented an 8 percent increase in volume over last year. Dean of Admissions Logan Powell cites The Brown Promise – a new initiative which replaces all loans in University financial aid packages – as having a major impact on the size and composition of the early pool. 62 percent of those admitted to Brown in early decision applied for financial aid, up from just 50 percent two years ago. Brown continues to push to diversify their student body, which is especially evident in the five percentage point increase in the number of first gen students in the ED admit group (17 percent this year versus 12 percent last year).

For the first time in four years, Cornell’s early decision admit rate increased. The university received 6,615 early decision applicants (a 7 percent increase over the past year’s ED applicant numbers) and admitted 23.8 percent (1,576 students), meaning its admit rate increased by 1.2 percentage points. Those admitted are estimated to comprise 49 percent of the Class of 2024. Interestingly, the number of women admitted this year decreased by four percentage points to 51.4 percent. Hard to know exactly what to make of this statistic—other than perhaps Cornell was concerned that it might be approaching a tipping point with respect to gender balance.

Dartmouth has offered admission to 547 early decision applicants, for an admit rate of 26 percent. The College’s official release notes that the early group includes record percentages of public high school students (54 percent), first-generation students (15 percent), foreign citizens (12 percent), and students of color (35 percent). The children of Dartmouth alumni represent 15 percent of the accepted students and recruited athletes make up 25 percent of the group.

At Duke, 887 students were admitted from a pool of 4,300 early decision applicants. With a drop in early applicants (over 11 percent from the prior year), Duke’s early acceptance rate increased to 21 percent, making this year’s ED process a bit less competitive than the past couple of years. Altogether, these students will comprise 51 percent of the incoming Class of 2024. Students of color comprise 46 percent of those admitted and international students make up another 6 percent.

Harvard saw its early action pool decrease by 7.7 percent, the first time since the fall of 2013 that the university’s early action pool posted a decline. In all, 895 of 6,424 early applicants were offered early admission to the Class of 2024. The 13.9 percent acceptance rate represents a 0.5 percent increase from last year. The early admission acceptance rate has not increased year-over-year since 2013. Dean Fitzsimmons takes a global view to explain the decrease, pointing to everything from wildfires in California (the number of early applicants from California declined nearly 17 percent) to school shootings and economic uncertainty to declining numbers of high school seniors. Women comprise 51.7 percent of the admitted class thus far, slightly more than last year, when women made up 51.3 percent of the early admit class. It seems that Harvard tipped in favor of women who are interested in the physical sciences and computer science. This year, 57.4 percent of admitted students who said they intend to concentrate in the physical sciences are women, compared to 52.9 percent last year and 33 percent the year before. For computer science, 49.1 percent of interested students are women, an increase from 42.9 percent last year, and 29 percent the year before.

Penn admitted 19.7 percent of early decision applicants to the Class of 2024 — breaking nearly a decade of declining ED acceptance rates. Of those who are United States citizens or permanent residents, 52 percent identify as students of a minority group, an increase from 48 percent last year. Similarly, 54 percent of admitted students identified as female, an increase from 51 percent last cycle. 10 percent of admitted students are first-generation college students, a slight decrease from last year’s 11 percent. Of students admitted to the Class of 2024, 24 percent had a parent or grandparent who attended Penn. Last year, 23 percent of admitted students were legacies.

Explaining the drop in ED application volume, Dean Eric Furda in an interview in the student paper seems to suggest a return to “normal” after a “bump” caused by higher scores on the redesigned SAT and students who therefore saw themselves as stronger. He, too, seems to raise the notion that natural disasters, power outages, and teacher strikes impacted the numbers of students applying ED.

Princeton University has offered admission to 791 students in its early pool this year (although the university coyly refrains from telling us how many students applied, suggesting it, too, saw a smaller pool). Of those admitted, 48 percent of students self-identify as students of color, 16 percent are from low income backgrounds, 13 percent are first generation college students, and 11 percent are international students.

Yale’s early application volume also decreased this year to 5,777, down 4 percent from last year’s record-setting pool of 6,020 students. Although short on details about the admitted group, a news release points to an announcement earlier this year from Yale that the past several classes have all set records for socioeconomic diversity, with more than 1,000 undergraduates receiving Federal Pell grants. Of those, more than 600 are in the first-year and sophomore classes. Additionally, the number of students per class who will be the first in their families to graduate from college has increased by 75 percent in the past six years.

Over on the West Coast, there are crickets from Stanford on the details of its early applicant pool and REA admits. The school announced last fall that starting with the Class of 2023, it will stop releasing admissions data until well after the admissions cycle concludes. The change was intended to reduce the “outsized emphasis placed on the admit rates at U.S. colleges and universities,” according to the Stanford news site. “By focusing on the admit rate, talented students who would thrive at Stanford may opt not to apply because they think Stanford seems out of reach,” said Provost Persis Drell.

But, stop the presses, Stanford did just release its overall admissions data for the Class of 2023. Its admit rate fell to a record-low 4.34 percent. Out of a record-high 47,498 applicants to Stanford’s Class of 2023, 2,062 were offered admission.

UPDATE

For two years in a row, Georgetown University has seen its early application volume decrease. This year, 7,305 students submitted early action applications, a decrease of nearly 13 percent since the fall of 2017 when nearly 8,400 students submitted early applications. To be sure, the fact that Georgetown uses a separate – and somewhat cumbersome – application may be a deterrent to students, as is its somewhat unclear testing policies. Georgetown’s Dean of Admissions Charlie Deacon points, instead, to the increased pressure that students feel to choose a binding early decision program (versus a non-binding early action program like Georgetown’s) as the cause of the decrease. In particular, two of Georgetown’s biggest competitors – UVA and BC – both implemented binding early decision programs this year.

Interestingly, Georgetown chose to accept a smaller percentage of its early pool this year – 11.72 percent of early applicants (a record low) were offered admission despite the falling numbers of applicants for the last two years. We wonder why Georgetown chose to do this, especially since Dean Deacon makes a point of highlighting the strength of the pool despite the decreasing numbers of applicants. Could it be looking for the silver lining – “most selective early process yet” – despite the downturn in application volume? If two of your competitors are taking a bigger slice of your market share, wouldn’t you want a slightly larger admit group to help yield the very best students in your early pool?

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available!

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Admissions application deadlines college admissions Early Decision Early Decision II

Class of 2024: Early Decision and Early Action Notification Dates

Your early round applications are IN and as the great Tom Petty originally sang, ‘The waiting is the hardest part’. Boy, was he ever right! We’ve compiled the most up-to-date listing of early decision and early action notification dates for you. Sit back, relax and let the admissions letters (acceptances we hope) roll in!

Best of luck!!

Update_Early_Decision_Notification_Dates

As promised, early results are rolling in for Top Tier students… Harvard, Princeton, Dartmouth, Swarthmore… the list goes on and year after year, we are overcome with joy! What a wonderful time of year! Hard work pays off and when we release our final results you’ll see just what we mean.

Many of the below have been updated as results are being released as we type… stay tuned and be sure to check your email (that you submitted your application with) frequently!

EARLY DECISION NOTIFICATION DATES –CLASS OF 2024

Amherst College December 15th
Babson College EDI & EA: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Barnard College Mid-December
Boston College EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th
Boston University

Brown University

EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th

Mid-December

Bucknell University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
California Institute of Technology (Caltech) EA: Mid-December
Carnegie Mellon University ED: December 15th
Claremont McKenna College EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th
Colgate University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-March
Columbia University Mid-December
Connecticut College EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Cornell University December 12th
Dartmouth College December 12th
Duke University December 12th
Emory University EDI: by December 15th; EDII: by February 15th
Georgetown University December 15th
Hamilton College

 

Harvard University

EDI: by December 15th; EDII by February 15th

December 12th

Harvey Mudd College EDI: mailed December 15th; EDII: mailed February 15th
Haverford College EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th
Johns Hopkins University by December 15th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology December 14th
Middlebury College

New York University

EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February

EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th

Northwestern University Mid-December
Pomona College EDI: by December 15th; EDII: by February 15th
Princeton University December 12th
Rice University by mid-December
Stanford University December 15th
Swarthmore College Online December 12th
Tufts University EDI: mid-December; EDII: mid-February
Tulane University ED: by December 15th; EA: January 15th
University of Chicago EA/EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
University of Michigan EA: no later than December 24th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by end of January
University of Pennsylvania ED: Mid-December
University of Virginia ED: Mid-December; EA: aim to release by Mid-February
Vanderbilt University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Villanova University

Wake Forest University

EDI: by December 20th

EDI: Rolling by mail only; EDII: approximately February 15th by mail only

Washington University in St. Louis EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 14th
Wellesley College EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February; Regular Decision w/Early Evaluation: Late February
Wesleyan University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Williams College December 15th
Worcester Polytechnic Institute EAI: December 20th; EAII: February 10th
Yale University SCEA: December 16th, 5pm EST

Notice a school of interest not listed? Simply let us know in the comments and we’ll gather the information for you and post.

Categories
college admissions College Application Secrets College Essays Early Decision Seniors

Is Early Decision Right for You?

For many students, the most fraught part of the admissions process is not writing essays or asking for letters of recommendation, but choosing an Early Decision school. Applying Early Decision allows students to submit an application to a single school during the fall and receive that school’s admissions decision shortly afterwards (usually in December). The catch: Early Decision is binding. If students are admitted to their ED school, they must attend.

For many students, this is a stressful premise. How can you identify the one school that is the best fit for you? Should you commit to a single school at the outset of your senior year, or should you wait to see the results of all of your applications? If you do decide to apply Early Decision, should you apply to a major reach school or aim for one more easily in range?

We know this is a major decision for many of our students, so we’ve provided some general guidelines below to help you make this choice. We recommend that you apply Early Decision if:

You have a clear top-choice school: If your favorite school offers Early Decision, it makes sense to apply in that round. After all, you’d be more than happy to commit to attending that school! As a bonus, if you are admitted in the Early Decision round, you’ll be done with the college admissions process before the end of winter break. No regular round stress for you.

You want to boost your odds of admission: As we’ve discussed before, applying to a school Early Decision can double your odds of admission in some cases. The Early Decision applicant pool is usually much smaller than the applicant pool in the regular round, which allows admissions officers to spend more time reviewing each application. What’s more, schools that offer Early Decision generally fill about half of the incoming class in the early round. As a result, your odds of admission are always higher in Early Decision than they would be in the regular round. Last year, for example, Columbia had an early admit rate of 14.57% and a Regular Decision admit rate of 4.04%. (For more on the early admit rates for some of the very top schools, take a look at the data we’ve collected here.)

The one caveat: your odds will only improve in the Early Decision round if that school is in range for you. While the Early Decision applicant pool may be smaller overall, it will still include lots of very qualified candidates. If your grades and test scores are well below average for a school, your application won’t make it through the admissions review process, even in the early round. 

You are a legacy: There’s no denying that being a legacy gives you an advantage at almost every school. (For more details on how this works, check out our recent blog post on legacy hooks.) In many cases, however, legacy status carries far more weight during the early round. Some schools, like Cornell, are very up-front about the importance of applying Early Decision for legacy applicants. Other schools may not say this outright, but they generally follow similar practices. This means that — if you are a legacy applicant at a school you love — applying Early Decision to that school will allow you to get the most out of your legacy status.

We hope this helps you to figure out if Early Decision is the right choice for you! If it is, take a look at the deadlines for some top Early Decision schools:

EARLY DECISION DEADLINES

Amherst College – Nov. 1, 2019

Babson College – Nov. 1, 2019

Barnard College – Nov. 1, 2019

Bates College – Nov. 15, 2019

Bentley University – Nov. 15, 2019

Boston College – Nov. 1, 2019

Boston University – Nov. 1, 2019

Bowdoin College – Nov. 15, 2019

Brown University – Nov. 1, 2019

Bryn Mawr College – Nov. 15, 2019

Bucknell University – Nov. 15, 2019

Carnegie Mellon University – Nov. 1, 2019

Claremont McKenna College – Nov. 1, 2019

Colby College – Nov. 15, 2019

Colgate University – Nov. 15, 2019

Columbia University – Nov. 1, 2019

Connecticut College – Nov. 15, 2019

Cornell University – Nov. 1, 2019

Dartmouth University – Nov. 1, 2019

Dickinson College – Nov. 15, 2019

Duke University – Nov. 1, 2019

Emory University – Nov. 1, 2019

Harvey Mudd College – Nov. 15, 2019

Haverford College – Nov. 15, 2019

Johns Hopkins University – Nov. 1, 2019

Middlebury University – Nov. 1, 2019

New York University – Nov. 1, 2019

Northwestern University – Nov. 1, 2019

Pomona College – Nov. 1, 2019

Rice University – Nov. 1, 2019

Swarthmore College – Nov. 15, 2019

Tufts University – Nov. 1, 2019

Tulane University – Nov. 1, 2019

University of Chicago – Nov. 1, 2019

University of Pennsylvania – Nov. 1, 2019

University of Virginia – Oct. 15, 2019

Vanderbilt University – Nov. 1, 2019

Villanova University – Nov. 1, 2019

Washington University in St. Louis – Nov. 1, 2019

Williams College – Nov. 15, 2019

Categories
Admissions college admissions Early Decision Ivy Admissions Ivy League Admissions Seniors

Early Admissions Trends Class of 2023

With results now coming in on the early admissions round at top colleges and universities around the country, here’s our expert assessment on what we’ve learned thus far. We’ll continue to update our information as more schools release their information.

What do we know so far? Unlike past years that saw big gains in everyone’s early numbers, this year was more of a mixed bag. Brown’s early decision application volume zoomed up 21 percent and Duke notched a nearly 20 percent increase; applications to Emory’s first round ED program are up about 12 percent; Columbia is up nine percent; and Yale and Penn both posted solid five percent gains in early volume this year. A few key schools are reporting slight decreases in early volume – Penn and Harvard included.  Some deans postulate that we’ve reached a natural ceiling or this plateau is a ‘new normal’. It could also be that savvy students are being more strategic in how they use their early option, aiming for a surer bet rather than going for the long-shot.

TRENDS THUS FAR

  • The year of the woman extends beyond the Congress to the university. Actually, women have outpaced men in college-going rates for many years, but that hasn’t always been the case all across the Ivies. Harvard, especially, points to increased numbers of women who plan to major in both Physical Sciences and Computer Science.
  • Diversity of background continues to be a key priority in the selection process. Schools are working actively to build more diversity into their applicant pools through targeted outreach and partnerships with organizations like Questbridge.
  • Many schools with binding early decision programs will admit 45-50+ percent of their incoming class through the early process. Doing so ensures that they can lock in a solid foundation for their incoming class and reduce yield volatility.

EARLY ADMISSIONS –BY THE NUMBERS

BROWN UNIVERSITY

Brown admitted 760 students this December, corresponding to roughly 46 percent of its incoming class. The admitted group represents just 18 percent of its 4,230 early decision applicants, making this the most competitive early decision process they’ve ever experienced. The 4,230 students represented a 21 percent increase in volume over last year. Dean of Admissions Logan Powell cites The Brown Promise – a new initiative which replaces all loans in University financial aid packages – as having a major impact on the size and composition of the early pool. Over half of this year’s admits intend to apply for financial aid and Brown notes a nearly 45 percent increase in applicants from the Midwest – both they attribute to the Brown Promise initiative. Brown continues to push to diversify their student body. This year, 46 percent of the admitted group are U.S. students of color (up from 38 percent last year) and 12 percent are first in their families to go to college.

DUKE UNIVERSITY

According to the Duke official release, 882 students were admitted from a pool of 4,852 early decision applicants. With a record number of early applicants (up nearly 20 percent from the prior year), Duke’s early acceptance rate decreased to 18 percent, making this year’s ED process the toughest it has ever been. Altogether, these students will comprise 51 percent of the incoming Class of 2023. Students of color comprise 46 percent of those admitted and international students make up another six percent.

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

From a pool of applicants that numbered 2,474, Dartmouth admitted 574 students to the Class of 2023 (23 percent admit rate). The admitted group includes 25 students who applied through Questbridge. Hooks are clearly at play in the early group admitted to Dartmouth. A third of those admitted are students of color and fourteen percent are the first in their families to go to college (a record high for Dartmouth). Twenty percent of those admitted are legacies and twenty-five percent are recruited athletes. Altogether, these students will comprise 50 percent of Dartmouth’s incoming first year class.

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

Princeton University has offered admission to 743 students from a pool of 5,335 candidates, (13.9 percent of the pool) making this year’s early action process the most competitive since the school reinstated early action in 2011. It looks like Princeton chose to admit 56 fewer SCEA students this round—allowing it to post its record low admit rate.

Some additional interesting tidbits about the Princeton SCEA admits are that 50 percent are domestic students of color (African American, Asian American, Latino, and Native American) and another 10 percent are international citizens. Fifteen percent are alumni children. A full 21 percent want to study engineering.

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Penn’s early decision applicant pool has also plateaued, after several years of steady growth.  In total, Penn counts 7,112 students in its early decision pool, a 0.22 percent increase from the prior year. This year’s plateau comes on the heels of a record-breaking 15 percent increase in early decision applications for the Class of 2022. A total of 1,279 students were admitted early (17.9 percent), making up 53 percent of the incoming class. Women outpace men in the early group, making up 51 percent of those admitted. The diversity of the early group includes 48 percent students of color and 13 percent international students. Twenty-three percent are children of Penn alumni; 11 percent are the first in their families to go to college.

HARVARD UNIVERSITY

This year marks the most competitive early admissions cycle since Harvard reinstated early action seven years ago, as reported in a story in the Harvard Crimson. Harvard notes a five-percentage point increase in early application volume, to 6,958 submitted applications, leading to a 13.4 percent rate of admission. Dean Bill Fitzsimmons makes special note of the numbers of women admitted at this stage: women make up 51.3 percent of the admitted class, up four percentage points from last year at the same time. He goes on to share a marked increase in the percentage of women who wish to major in physical sciences and computer science. The other interesting headline from the Harvard results is that the number of Asian American students admitted increased by two percentage points. Perhaps not altogether that surprising, given both the composition of the applicant pool and the intense legal and public scrutiny Harvard’s admissions process has been experiencing of late.

YALE UNIVERSITY

Yale’s early application volume also grew by five percent, to a record high 6,020 applicants. Yale has seen its early application volume increase by 1,000 students since the fall of 2017. Leading the growth has been increased numbers of students from underrepresented backgrounds as well as students from the West and South. This year, 13.4 percent of the applicants (794 students) were offered admission in the early round.

EMORY UNIVERSITY

For yet another year, Emory University has received a record number of applications for the first round of its early decision admissions process.  This year, Emory received 1,910 applications (representing students who chose Emory College or Arts and Sciences, Oxford College, or both), an 11.7 percent increase over last year’s record amount.  From that pool, 815 students were offered admission (559 to Emory College and 256 to Oxford College). Helping to drive this year’s application growth were more students who applied through the Questbridge National College Match program.

BARNARD COLLEGE

Barnard College saw its early decision application volume increase by 24 percent. The school received 1,235 applications this year as compared to 993 last year.

Early Admissions StanfordEarly Admissions Stanford

Early Admissions Stanford

Early Admissions Stanford

Early Admissions Stanford

Early Admissions Stanford

 

 

 

EARLY ADMISSIONS NEWS FROM THE WEST

STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Over on the West Coast, crickets from Stanford on the details of its early applicant pool and REA admits. The school announced this fall that starting with the Class of 2023, it will stop releasing admissions data altogether. This decision sets Stanford apart from the vast majority of top tier colleges and universities, most of which annually provide some context for the admissions results. Stanford notes this decision stems from not wanting its rock-bottom admit rate to dissuade prospective students from applying. Later on, we’ll have a chance to see Stanford’s macro admissions data, as all schools receiving federal funds need to report their data to the National Center for Educational Statistics.

Stay tuned for more updates as they become available!

Categories
Admissions college admissions Early Decision Seniors

Early Decision and Early Action Notification Dates

Dun-dun-duuunnnnnn… The moment many seniors (and their parents) have been waiting for is finally upon us! You’ve done the arduous (and so worth it!) work of creating a compelling early application package. WAITING for those early notification dates to round the corner can be killer but for now, take a moment and congratulate yourself on slaying an extremely difficult process.

NO FEAR, TOP TIER IS HERE

In an attempt to take a likely stressor off your plate (enough with the college research) we’ve compiled our annual list of early action and early decision notification dates just for you. Best of luck!!

EARLY DECISION NOTIFICATION DATES –CLASS OF 2023

Amherst College December 15th
Babson College EDI & EA: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Barnard College Mid-December
Boston College December 20th
Brown University Mid-December
Bucknell University EDI & II: within one month from ED date
California Institute of Technology (Caltech) EA: Mid-December
Carnegie Mellon University ED: December 15th
Claremont McKenna College EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th
Colgate University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: within 4 weeks of receipt of all materials
Columbia University Mid-December
Connecticut College EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Cornell University Mid-December
Dartmouth College Mid-December
Duke University December 15th
Emory University EDI: by December 15th; EDII: by February 15th
Georgetown University by December 15th
Harvard University No earlier than 7pm EST on December 13th
Harvey Mudd College EDI: mailed December 15th; EDII: mailed February 15th
Haverford College EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th
Johns Hopkins University by December 15th
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mid-December
New York University EDI: December 15th; EDII: February 15th
Northwestern University Mid-December
Pomona College EDI: by December 15th; EDII: by February 15th
Princeton University Mid-December
Rice University by Mid-December
Stanford University December 7th
Swarthmore College Online by Mid-December
Tufts University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Tulane University ED: by December 15th; EA: January 15th
University of Chicago EA/EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
University of Michigan EA: no later than December 24th
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by end of January
University of Pennsylvania ED: December 13th, 7pm EST
University of Virginia No later than January 31st
Vanderbilt University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Wake Forest University ED: Rolling; EDII: approximately February 15th
Washington University in St. Louis ED1: by December 15th; EDII: by February 15th
Wellesley College ED1: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February; Regular Decision with Early Evaluation Option: Late March
Wesleyan University EDI: Mid-December; EDII: Mid-February
Williams College December 15th
Worcester Polytechnic Institute EAI: December 20th; EAII: February 10th
Yale University SCEA: Online Mid-December

Notice a school of interest not listed? Simply let us know in the comments and we’ll gather the information for you and post.

Additional schools based on comments:

U Miami:
EDI: Late December; EA: Late January; EDII: Mid-February

Georgia Tech:
EA: January 12

UT Austin:
February 1

U Richmond:
EDI: ~ December 15; EDII: ~February 15